This is meant for you. Yes, you.

Deb shared this adorable love note from her son, Noah.

Deb shared this adorable love note from her son, Noah.

My sister, Renee, posted a wonderful story about a young woman who hand-wrote anonymous letters of encouragement, kindness and warmth to strangers, then quietly placed them all over New York City- on car windshields, in bicycle baskets, libraries, and coffee shops. She didn’t wait to see people’s reaction- she didn’t do it for the notoriety. She did it to help herself through her own rough patch. She found strength through her encouragement of others. Once she launched her website, the movement grew. Soon, she was responsible for people receiving “bundles” of letters, sometimes hundreds at a time- at a moment they most needed them. Over 60,000 ‘love letters’ across six continents have been received because of her kindness, her willingness to be present for a stranger.

Mary Kay Consultant extraordinaire Cheryl Richardson shared this beautiful note of support from a friend.

Mary Kay Consultant extraordinaire Cheryl Richardson shared this beautiful note of support from a friend.

She simply asked this question: “Do YOU need a love letter today? Just ask.”

Do you? Yes– you, reading this right now– DO you?

Because this letter is for you.

Dear friend,

Today, I am holding you in my mind and in my heart, willing you to be courageous and strong, yet forgiving of yourself. We are, none of us, perfect. We lose our way, we find it again, and then we blink and it’s gone and we are out looking for it all over again. This stuff of being human is work, and it can be lonely and hard, and sometimes it feels like we are alone in the moment, in the story, in the universe.

Today is different, friend. Because today, I’ve got you covered. Let me hold your worries, and your troubles for this brief time. I’ve got strength enough for the both of us.

Rest. Put your feet up, I got this.

All I ask is that you be kind to yourself, remember that you are doing the best you can with what you have. And if you aren’t, then try again tomorrow. It is simply how we’re made- imperfect, but all wanting the same basic things: to be loved, to find safety and happiness and the chance to live in a way that has meaning for us, and for the people we love.

It’s okay that you aren’t perfect, that you didn’t get it all right, that you missed something, or made a mistake. It’s okay. Really. Do what you need to in order to make it right inside of you. That’s all you can control, or fix.

Yes, start again tomorrow, after you’ve caught your breath, and remembered your purpose.

I will still be here, just read this letter again, meant just for you. Yes, you.

With respect, gratitude and encouragement just for you-

Corey

Some more love notes:

My friend, Erika’s sweet note from her daughter (love the addition of her last name…)

My friend, Erika’s sweet note from her daughter (love the addition of her last name…)

From my zumba friend Lisa’s son- so wonderful!

From my zumba friend Lisa’s son- so wonderful!

Our daughter (Larry) wrote this to her older brother- she’s working two agendas, giving him some love and working to secure her spot as his favorite sister!

Our daughter (Larry) wrote this to her older brother- she’s working two agendas, giving him some love and working to secure her spot as his favorite sister!

Are you on Twitter? I always love to hear your stories! @CoreyJamisonLLC

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

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Today, I won.

My beautiful, courageous friend who would drop everything to help me, you- a stranger– finds her way through the tougher parts of life…

My beautiful, courageous friend who would drop everything to help me, you- a stranger– finds her way through the tougher parts of life…

This is a blog written by my sweet friend of many, many years, who has struggled with her weight since I have known her. She is exploring the possibility of gastric bypass surgery– and courageously offers us a glimpse into her decision-making process. In the spirit of paying attention to one another through our hard times, saying what needs to be said, and offering kindness to one another, I post this with admiration and love in my heart for my beautiful friend, who is gutsy, beautiful and full of the same questions we all face: What do I deserve? How can I help myself face my demons? Embrace joy and well-being? What is my place here, and how can I best live?

6 March 2015

I am STILL going to the mandatory group therapy sessions. It’s supposed to be 6 weeks, but we have had so much snow that they have been cancelled three times and are going on forever. I have to say, I kind of hated them at first, and I still do, at certain moments. But there is a piece of me that is fighting for everyone in that room. Fighting for and rooting for them to be a success, to make the changes and do what they need to, to finally win the battle with food. It sounds so stupid to say it out loud. “Win the battle with food.” Seriously? It’s a piece of lasagna. Not a 6’4 280 pound snot dripping, pus filled, lecherous monster who is going to ravage you. But it might as well be for all the power we give it. How do we get to that? Really? How do we get in so deep that we hand over all our power to a bowl of guacamole and chips?

I guess that’s the point of therapy, really. And I think it’s a good point. This is going to be life altering if I choose to have this surgery, and it should not be entered into lightly. I should be thinking about what got me here. I should be recognizing that my attachment to food isn’t healthy, or balanced, I should be recognizing that change is incredibly hard, I should know that habits are brutal to break, and baby, I’m all about the bad habits with food.

BUT, those habits can be broken. I have to say, I felt pretty powerful yesterday. I had a crazy, crazy day. The kind of crazy where you forget things on top of your car, because you’re in such a rush to run to the next thing crazy, and then you get to your appointment and realize you left all your paperwork at home? Yeah, that kind of crazy. Typically, that kind of crazy brings me to a drive thru. It’s an excuse really. ”I’m so busy I can’t possibly take time to eat well or have good nutrition. I’m so busy that only a fat, carbohydrate and calorie laden lunch will fuel me well enough to keep up with the rest of my day.” Oh yeah, and make sure it’s washed down with at least a super sized cup of a chemically laced, artificially sweetened and caffeinated drink. And refill that baby too!”

But yesterday I didn’t do that. Did you hear me, friends? I DIDN’T DO THAT!! I ate breakfast, I went out and when things went all crazy I kept drinking my water, got an apple to hold me over until I could eat a good lunch, then left the apple on the counter, and was good and pissed off about it when I got down the street in my car. Then, I thought “well, now I really have to go through the drive thru!” But I didn’t. I said no to that habit. I told myself to just hold on a little longer, and I did. I got through my next errand, I sat down, I had a flatbread sandwich and it was really good. It filled me up. And even though the bakery counter was flirting with me, and winking, and saying, “Hey you! Hey pretty, chubby, sugar and carb loving lovely lady, come on over here,” I ignored it. I looked the other way and did not let that bakery counter win me with false compliments. 🙂 I continued on with the rest of my day, stayed on track, and felt like a superstar at the end of the night.

I know it was just one day. I know. But it was one good day that I won. One day that I took back my power and made the good and right choice for my body and my life. And this morning, I’m feeling a little stronger because of it.

Cheering for you and your courage today, friend. xxoo

Are you on Twitter? I always love to hear your stories! @CoreyJamisonLLC

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

Posted in Uncategorized

Only kind words for women and moms@work

Gabrielle Jackson traveled from her home in Australia to India in search of a good kebab. Immediately, I can relate to a woman who would go a substantial distance for food.

What happened next was unthinkable—running in flip flops to catch up with friends who had boarded a train leaving the platform, she fell onto the tracks and found herself conscious, under the train and watching it pass inches over her head. She survived, with some bumps and bruises, bringing renewed meaning to the word ‘miraculous.’

Gabrielle’s friends were unable to get the train stopped, and frantically disembarked at the next station. A group of women awaited them shouting “your friend is alive!!” and directed them to the next train that would take them back to Gabrielle. Awaiting them at that station was another group of excited women who brought them to the stationmaster’s office, where Gabrielle’s injuries were being treated, as she prepared to go to the hospital.

I love a ‘surviving the odds’ story for the gratifying deposit it makes into my “reasons to hope ” account. I grab Facebook stories of beating the odds with the urgency I would expend on diving face-first for the (good) candy from a birthday party piñata, like a mini-insurance policy should there come a time when I may have to believe in the long shot because it’s all I have.

But what caught my attention about this story was the somewhat mysterious appearance of groups of women, who positioned themselves to help, to be there for Gabrielle and her friends.

Wonderful friends who speak only kind words to and about one another at a Make a Wish luncheon recognizing the volunteerism and contribution of Kiki Wagner. Note Sabrina Mosseau (of Mammos and Ammo and Grammies and Mammies) couldn’t make the event, so she joined from her… ummmm…. car?

Wonderful friends who speak only kind words to and about one another at a Make a Wish luncheon recognizing the volunteerism and contribution of Kiki Wagner. Note Sabrina Mosseau (of Mammos and Ammo and Grammies and Mammies) couldn’t make the event, so she joined from her… ummmm…. car?

As women, we know how to mobilize when another woman, or a family needs us. We cook, pick up kids, schedule drop-off dinners for a month, offer a shoulder, a hand, a tissue. We grieve for one another, celebrate joy, we defend, standing by as witnesses for each other’s stories. We ensure our collective safety by walking in groups. We go to the restaurant bathroom in pairs. It’s what we do.

But there’s another side to what we do, too, one that is not so helpful.

My friend and colleague Fred Miller talks about racism or sexism or homophobia or any type of oppression as a giant boulder rolling, speeding down a hill. When we see it coming, we can choose to get out of its way IF we have the social privilege and power to, and if it’s not aimed directly for us.

This time, at least.

We can speak up against that boulder as it speeds by and that might slow down for a time, but then it speeds back up while we’re all talk and no action.

Or we can CHOOSE to have the courage to jump in front of that boulder with the full on intent of stopping it once and for all. But what happens if I jump in front of that boulder alone? Or if Gabrielle, or me or you or any one of us jumps in front of that boulder without all of us, locked arms, and beside them?

Yes, they get rolled over, or give up, they lose their courage.

We need one another.

But, if we jump in front of that speeding boulder together, and show each other the way forward, the destruction it has already fallen in its path can begin to mend, to heal from the knowledge that we ALL chose courage to make change, to make a difference.

We have, as Women@Work, enormous power to help and encourage, but even more to hurt, to discourage. Every time we say a negative comment about another woman, we tap on that boulder and it gains speed, aimed for the next woman in its path who we cannot even see from our spot higher up on the hill.

A few months ago, at a gathering of a few hundred women, I pledged to speak only kind words about other women. Only kind words. I have done pretty well. Not perfect, but well. I am asking that you join me in this pledge to hold other women up- all the time. I ask you to not tap the boulder of sexism through words about other women that can hurt long beyond the moment they come from our mouths. Join me, please. I believe it will make a difference. It is the least we can do to extend the privilege we have.

If joining Women@Work provides the sense of belonging to a community of women who will speak kindly of one another, who will jump in front of that boulder together- arms inter-locked- then count me in. Because there will be days when I will need your courage and you will need mine- and we will all need each other to stop that speeding boulder once and for all.

And may it be soon, and may it be quick, and may it be that all of our handprints on that boulder, joined together, serve as a reminder that we chose to be there for one another, and it made all the difference.

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

Join in on the conversation! I always love to hear your stories! @CoreyJamisonLLC

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How I learned to pay attention.

Thank you to my friend and guest blogger, Brad Wagner, for this week’s wonderful post.  Brad is a loyal person, a stand up guy– Deb and I would call him a Mensch.  Brad sees good and possibility in people, and acknowledges it freely- encouraging those around him when they most need it, and even when they don’t.  He is an advocate for women, for people really, and a blessing to those fortunate to call him “friend.”

Here’s Brad on how the US Hostage Crisis in Iran taught him to pay attention:

Brad and Kiki’s happy, healthy, well-loved and attended children! Photo courtesy Meg Golden, www.mgoldenphoto.com.

Brad and Kiki’s happy, healthy, well-loved and attended children! Photo courtesy Meg Golden, http://www.mgoldenphoto.com.

January, 1981.  I was 7 years old and had no grasp on the political situation; I only knew that it was important that the hostages had been released.  I felt it necessary to thank someone, so that evening I thanked God.  It felt good.  I practiced this each night after climbing into bed and the reflection elicited a certain calm while etching in me an acute awareness of how lucky I was.  I began to consciously and consistently review the important people, places, and things in my life which contemporaneously resulted in my identifying that which did not matter.  Mitigating derisory distractions helped me invest my attention and energy where it mattered most.

What matters most has changed, as one would expect, as I have.  Years of self-reflection have provided clarity into my most important blessings.  But what then?  My thoughts of gratitude—clear as they are—mean little unless they manifest with passion and purpose.  If something truly matters, what am I doing about it?  How do I know what do?

I pay attention.

I pay attention to my wife, Kiki, and to what is and is not important to her.  I pay attention to her words, her actions, her cares and concerns.  I pay attention to her features, her body, mind, and spirit.  I pay attention to our marriage and the love and the lives that we are building and sharing.  I’m far from perfect, but I try.

Brad, Kiki (whose beautiful heart makes her the center of lots of love, friendship and community) with their kids. I just want to hug this whole family!!!! Photo courtesy of Meg Golden, www.mgoldenphoto.com.

Brad, Kiki (whose beautiful heart makes her the center of lots of love, friendship and community) with their kids. I just want to hug this whole family!!!! Photo courtesy of Meg Golden, http://www.mgoldenphoto.com.

I pay attention to my children, to their health, talents, and abilities.  I pay attention to their stories and jokes, to their homework, practices, recitals, and games.  I pay attention to their food choices and their artwork, to their accomplishments and setbacks.  I pay attention to their sensitivities and their fears, their hopes and their dreams.  I pay attention to the words they hear, the actions they see, and the time they spend.  That Kiki handily outshines me this category serves as a challenge to redouble my efforts.

I pay attention to my faith, to the beauty all around me, to the good and the light, to the words and writings of those who are wiser than I.  I pay attention to honesty, integrity, and kindness, to the simple and the magnificent.  I pay attention to those who are enduring the loss, pain, or disappearance of a loved one, to those who suffer and struggle.  I pay attention to forgiveness.

I pay attention to my country, to the abundance, freedoms, and liberties we enjoy.  I pay attention to the sacrifices made by so many so that we might have so much.

Alison Bonds Shapiro, author of Healing into Possibility, describes attention as “noticing and being with something without trying to change it.  Attention takes the time to fully explore, to discover whatever there is to know about something, to watch as things change by themselves without our trying to ‘fix’ anything.  Attention is patient and attention is kind.  No rush.  No burden.  No criticism.”

What better way to show gratitude than to pay attention?  From attention comes action and that allows me to answer the constant question: “What am I doing about it?”

I no longer pray in the evening—fueling my soul with the strength to do something about that which matters most to me and then dissolving into sleep seemed counterproductive.  Mornings are a more appropriate time to begin, and each day brings new opportunities to pay attention.

How do you slow yourself down to pay attention to life as it happens around you?  I always love to hear your stories! @CoreyJamisonLLC

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

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Be your own Valentine.

Valentine’s Day breakfast table!

Valentine’s Day breakfast table!

I love Valentine’s Day.

I know it’s a commercialized non-holiday intended to rake in boatloads of cash for the greeting card and floral industries.

Still, I roll around in it, I pinch its rosy cheeks and smooch it excessively. I can’t help myself- and I don’t want to.

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This year, at my first annual GALentine’s Day party (an event aimed at celebrating the many wonderful women I’ve met this year as part of building my business), a friend asked me “why Valentine’s Day?”

She sounded more incredulous than mere typed words can express, so picture her looking at me through squinted, searching eyes, as if Valentinese is my first language, and she is preparing to work very hard to understand my words.

“I love LOVE!” I squeal!

‘We all love love she says (sounding to me a bit like Roz from Monsters Inc.), trying to hide the hint of mockery that is almost impossible to avoid given the state of decoration of my house (which looks like one giant Valentine made by a Kindergartener with an overkill stock of red and pink craft supplies).

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It took me a long time to get love right as an adult, to find a grace-filled, equal, happy relationship. That’s worth celebrating!

My Valentine Loving Mama!

My Valentine Loving Mama!

My mom decorated for Valentine’s Day, and I loved it as a child, because I knew she was celebrating the magical overflow of love in her own life that included me. I honor her, and in some way connect with her- knowing that her love of her family and friends brought her joy in the same ways it brings me joy. THAT is worth celebrating!

Hallway of lovvvveeee!

Hallway of lovvvveeee!

I love love love my children, and have the blessing of step-children- a love that is earned- and so very special. And, I have an ‘extra’ child of my heart, whom I adore. I thank God every day for all of the happiness this blended, funny, complicated, joyful and sometimes crazy family brings to all of us. That is worth celebrating.

Finally, I’m not much of an interior decorator. I like purple, velvet, glitter and sequins. And purple velvet with glitter and/or sequins. That pretty much sums it up right there. Left to my own devices, I would likely cover the exterior of our brick house in the above. My husband fancies himself more capable in this department, sticking to the ‘craftsman’ style- which looks to me like the one room schoolhouse from Little House on the Prairie during the big harvest when no one came to school anyway (except the Olsens). I fail to see where the word “decoration” is even applicable, since having plain straight back wooden chairs and a matching plain table seems more painful necessity than decorative. Valentine’s Day gives me a chance to feel like I am the queen decorator, zee Goddess de Décoration.

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My motto? What’s worth doing is worth over-doing. Even my 7 year old describes my Valentine’s Day décor as “excessive” and I am bursting with delight as I ballet leap through the hallway of looovveeeee singing love songs in an operatic style that makes the kids rolls their eyes, annoyed, but certain that they are celebrated and loved (literally) like crazy, and they have the proof.

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So, yes, it’s a made up holiday (because all of the rest of them are… not?). Why not fall in love with it? What do you have to lose? What? You’re not in a relationship, or in one that’s not as happy as you’d like? Decide to be your own Valentine. Couldn’t we all use a little more self-love, acceptance, appreciation? More than a holiday, Valentine’s Day gives us an opportunity to slow down and be grateful for the love that IS in our lives, the relationships and friendships and caring we do have. I like to think that celebrating Valentine’s Day with all my heart will help remind me to feel and show this gratitude all year long.

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Happy Valentine’s Month!

Photos courtesy of John Bulmer http://www.bulmerphotography.com

Do you celebrate Valentine’s Month? CoreyJamisonLLC

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

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I found joy at St. Jude’s and lots of it.

St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, founded by Danny Thomas in Memphis, TN- a big shoutout to my Lebanese friends and my mom, who loved Marlo Thomas… hence my frequent references to all things “Free to Be You and Me!”

St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, founded by Danny Thomas in Memphis, TN- a big shoutout to my Lebanese friends and my mom, who loved Marlo Thomas… hence my frequent references to all things “Free to Be You and Me!”

American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities- ALSAC, the fundraising arm of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities- ALSAC, the fundraising arm of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Me and Danny Thomas!

Me and Danny Thomas!

I thought I would cry the whole time. I packed a pallet of tissues and worked to steel myself.

But, my tour last week through St. Jude’s Research Hospital was one of the most joyful experiences of my life.

The walls are painted in beautiful murals representing the seasons of life, and of healing.

The walls are painted in beautiful murals representing the seasons of life, and of healing.

They say God is in the details. At St. Jude’s, hope is in the details, in the little things that make such a big difference to families who are looking for, clinging to, any sign of hope. There is a sense of joy that comes with the kind of effort that has been made here to show love and caring toward families who so deeply need it.

ALSAC Goddesses Laura and Nicole show off one of their favorite walls of the hospital, and their little racoon friend!

ALSAC Goddesses Laura and Nicole show off one of their favorite walls of the hospital, and their little racoon friend!

These registration desks are kid-sized so children know from the start that this experience is all about their well being and care.

These registration desks are kid-sized so children know from the start that this experience is all about their well being and care.

I became involved with St. Jude’s when my beautiful, brilliant and big-hearted friend Susan Rosko Fogarty invited me and to be a Founding Member of the 100 Women of St. Jude in our local area. I went to a breakfast where she talked about her own experience with St. Jude’s, and I was ‘in’!

This musical staircase changes tune and sound weekly.

This musical staircase changes tune and sound weekly.

St. Jude’s is the world leader in understanding, treating and defeating childhood cancer and other diseases.

This ‘Kafe’ sponsored by Kay Jewelers, offers healthy food literally grown in the garden on site, so that nutritional value is not lost in the transportation of fresh fruits and veggies. No processed foods either!  The Chef here has been known to hide beets and kale in brownies and call kids’ grandmas to get the secret recipe for their favorite dishes, so they will eat and grow stronger.

This ‘Kafe’ sponsored by Kay Jewelers, offers healthy food literally grown in the garden on site, so that nutritional value is not lost in the transportation of fresh fruits and veggies. No processed foods either! The Chef here has been known to hide beets and kale in brownies and call kids’ grandmas to get the secret recipe for their favorite dishes, so they will eat and grow stronger.
Families never, ever get a bill from St. Jude’s. Not ever. St. Jude’s covers food, housing and travel because they want families to only have to worry about their child getting better.

St. Jude’s freely shares all scientific breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude’s means doctors and scientists can use those protocols to save an average of 1000 more children. 1000.

Art and color and vibrancy are everywhere.

Children travel around the hospital in wagons- much more fun than wheelchairs!

Children travel around the hospital in wagons- much more fun than wheelchairs!

One hallway holds an exhibit of children’s poetry based on letters of the alphabet

One hallway holds an exhibit of children’s poetry based on letters of the alphabet

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The artwork for each letter is changed periodically- except for ‘V’- it always stays the same. Man, it DOES suck to upchuck!

The Teen Art Gallery is home to more Courage than I can describe. Ever.

The Teen Art Gallery is home to more Courage than I can describe. Ever.

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I was so very proud to see the generosity of Price Chopper and the Golub family there. Thank you for all you do for the health and happiness of our community! I am a Price Chopper Shops4U LOVER (I really appreciate you, Mariann and Amy and Robert!), but after seeing our community so generously represented, I will never shop anywhere else- and that’s a lotta groceries for our big family!

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Nicole Spath, our wonderful local ALSAC representative, is so grateful to Neil and Jane Golub and the Golub Family Foundation

Nicole Spath, our wonderful local ALSAC representative, is so grateful to Neil and Jane Golub and the Golub Family Foundation

Beautiful children are everywhere

Beautiful children are everywhere

There is even a teen prom!

There is even a teen prom!

One mother’s true super hero

One mother’s true super hero

Parenting can be challenging and frustrating- and joyful and fun. But, sometimes it’s the kind of hard we all fear the most. The kind of hard that haunts us, makes us worry over the little sniffle, or extra tiredness. We need each other as parents, we just do. The number of parents I met at St. Jude’s who said, “if it weren’t for St. Jude, my child would not have lived” was incredible. Those parents need us, and we need them. They give us a chance to pay forward our blessings. There is a Jewish prayer for healing that says, “help us find the Courage to make our lives a blessing.” These St. Jude families, and staff members- they are making their lives a blessing, and I am better, we are all better, because of it.

If you would like to be one of the Founding 100 Women of St. Jude, please email me at Corey@coreyjamison.com.

Do you have a St. Jude connection? I always love to hear your stories! @CoreyJamisonLLC

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

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Women and our mirrors. It’s complicated.

Well, who knew that my last post on the “cougar thing” would have drawn out some of the funniest comments ever- and from our male readers!? I don’t think they intended to make me laugh so hard that tears were rolling down my face, but sentences like “Corey- your [sic] an attractive middle aged woman… if someone is [sic] younger approaches you say in the produce aisle and strikes up a conversation with you, you should feel grateful,” or “maybe you should just stay home and knit and let the other hot middle aged women feel some self worth” and my personal favorite “get off your pedestal and your act together.”

Knitting got multiple mentions, as did my (still looking all over my house for it) pedestal. I admit I laughed as hard at my own responses (I’m good at cracking myself up), and I did recalibrate my views on the whole topic thanks to Samazon and others…

Really, if you need a good belly laugh, last weeks comment are the place to go. Of course- the reason it’s funny and not a nightmare is that these men are not impacting my day to day life- they are not my husband, or boss at work, or people who have any (direct) influence or control over my life. They are not setting my pay, not evaluating my work or creating the HR policies that guide my work/life integration. The women around them are not so fortunate, though. The good news is that these intending-to-insult-me commenters really helped make my point: I want women, every single one of us, to look in the mirror and inside ourselves and see what’s right, not what’s wrong. I want us to love who we are and who we become with age, from the inside-out, not because someone else has to validate it from the outside-in.

My beautiful friend, Shonda- power-packed, funny, smart Ph.D student and wonderful mother of three!

My beautiful friend, Shonda- power-packed, funny, smart Ph.D student and wonderful mother of three!

My good friend, John Robinson of Our Ability says it best, “look in the mirror and choose to like what you see, love what’s right about you and see that first. Be kind to that person reflected in the mirror, the way you would someone you love, a best friend.”

I have a complicated relationship with the mirror, and I know I am not alone. In fact, too complicated and messy to even talk about here. But, I still believe that I can choose to clean up that relationship- and that will take courage, but I’ve got that, and when I don’t, I have good friends and my sister to ENcourage me.

You may remember Sabrina from Mammos and Ammo- Sassy, gifted and the friend you can rely on for the midnight hospital run for stitches, or to drive the getaway car… :-)

You may remember Sabrina from Mammos and Ammo- Sassy, gifted and the friend you can rely on for the midnight hospital run for stitches, or to drive the getaway car… 🙂

Here’s a start. This incredible video by The Mrs. had me in tears as complicated as my relationship with my mirror, but mostly I had tears of gratitude to the Mrs. Band for this gift to all of us. Please watch it now. Like right now, this minute.

You will be so happy you did.

Fun and fabulous Laura of the Troy Hilton Garden Inn- her gracious ‘we WILL get it done’ attitude and caring for her many, many friends have helped to make this venue a regional favorite!

Fun and fabulous Laura of the Troy Hilton Garden Inn- her gracious ‘we WILL get it done’ attitude and caring for her many, many friends have helped to make this venue a regional favorite!

May we all hear the voices of those who loves us, as if they are our own. May we feel the love for ourselves that they feel for us, as we look back at that beautiful woman we see in the mirror.

It won’t hurt to listen to The Mrs. song about 1000 times in a row either!

My friend Andrea (the one who loves her sister like I love my sister!) with her fabulous smile!

My friend Andrea (the one who loves her sister like I love my sister!) with her fabulous smile!

More on The Mrs.:

We are The Mrs., an all-female band from Austin, Texas. We recently asked women how they felt when they looked in the mirror. As you can see, we didn’t like the answer, so we decided to help change it.

“ENOUGH” looking in the mirror with such a critical eye.
“ENOUGH” of that negative voice we hear in our heads.
“ENOUGH” letting the world tell us who we should be.

The Mrs.’ debut single, “Enough,” was written to help women see ourselves with a less critical eye, and realize that we are “Enough” just the way we are. Instead of creating a traditional music video, we opted to do something unconventional: take our message directly to the women who inspire us.

Purchase “Enough” on iTunes: http://bit.ly/1n3tHsa

Check out what went on behind the scenes: http://youtu.be/Q_Yfw3raILw

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My friend Nancy’s grand-princess. Someday we’ll be voting for her for President…

My friend Nancy’s grand-princess. Someday we’ll be voting for her for President…

This blog was originally published by the Times Union and can be accessed here.

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